News Highlights

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Dec 6

Sixteen UC Santa Barbara researchers have been named among the most influential scientists in the world, according to the 2018 Highly Cited Researchers List released by Clarivative Analytics (formerly Thomson Reuters). See the full list here

Nov 28

Five UC Santa Barbara professors join the ranks as Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for 2018. Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers for “their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished.”

The new fellows include Craig Carlson, a professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology (EEMB); Bruce Luyendyk, a professor emeritus of marine geophysics; and Trevor Hayton, prfoessor of chemistry and biochemistry.

Nov 15
UC Santa Barbara scholar Jeffrey C. Stewart has won the National Book Award for nonfiction for “The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke,” his meticulous and sensitive biography of the African American philosopher and activist who was a central figure in the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s.
 
The award was announced Wednesday, Nov. 14, in a ceremony in New York City.
Nov 13

Recognized for their outstanding contributions to the advancement, use and communication of mathematics, UC Santa Barbara Professors Hector Ceniceros and Zhenghan Wang have been named 2019 fellows of the American Mathematical Society (AMS). The association of mathematicians promotes mathematical research and scholarship.

Ceniceros’ work focuses on techniques to understand physical systems that have different properties on different scales, such as complex fluids and soft materials. Wang, who considers himself a maverick mathmatician, investigates exotic phases of matter.

Nov 6

Charles Hale, the SAGE Sara Miller McCune Dean of Social Sciences at UC Santa Barbara, will discuss the meaning of his research in a talk titled “Race, Rights and Resources: Bringing ‘Home’ Three Decades of Activist Research in Latin America.” For 30 years, Hale has studied the indigenous and Afro-descendant peoples of Latin America and the Caribbean, focusing on racial and ethnic relations, racism, social movements for rights and resources. 

This Diversity Lecture sponsored by the campus’s MultiCultural Center (MCC) will begin at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, in the MCC Theater. It is free and open to the public.

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